Monthly Archives: September 2013

African Politics and Society: A Mosaic in Transformation

imgAFRICAN POLITICS AND SOCIETY: A MOSAIC IN TRANSFORMATION is the first single-authored textbook to examine continuity and change in African politics and society from the pre-colonial era to the present. It fills the needs of those with little prior knowledge while balancing this background information with thorough analysis for those already familiar with the subject. An emphasis has been placed on making sense of general developments Continue reading

Encountering Morocco: Fieldwork and Cultural Understanding (Public Cultures of the Middle East and North Africa)

imgEncountering Morocco introduces readers to life in this North African country through vivid accounts of fieldwork as personal experience and intellectual journey. We meet the contributors at diverse stages of their careers–from the unmarried researcher arriving for her first stint in the field to the seasoned fieldworker returning with spouse and children. They offer frank descriptions of what it means to take up residence in a place where Continue reading

States and Power in Africa: Comparative Lessons in Authority and Control (Princeton Studies in International History and Politics)

imgTheories of international relations, assumed to be universally applicable, have failed to explain the creation of states in Africa. There, the interaction of power and space is dramatically different from what occurred in Europe. In his groundbreaking book, Jeffrey Herbst places the African state-building process in a truly comparative perspective, examining the problem of state consolidation from the precolonial period, through the short but intense interlude of European colonialism, to the modern era of independent states. Herbst’s bold contention–that the conditions now facing African state-builders existed long before European penetration of the continent–is sure to provoke controversy, for it runs counter to the prevailing assumption that colonialism changed everything. Continue reading

Renewable Energy Desalination: An Emerging Solution to Close the Water Gap in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA Development Report)

imgThe Middle East and North Africa (MENA) Region is one of the most water stressed regions in the world. Water scarcity has already become a challenge to development in many of the countries. Due to increasing population and Projected climate change impacts, MENA s annual water demand gap is projected to grow five-fold by 2050, from today s 42 Km3 to 200 km3 by 2050. Despite its extreme scarcity, water is managed poorly. Inefficiencies are common in the agriculture, municipal and industrial systems; and many utilities are financially unsustainable. As a result, countries overexploit their fossil aquifers and use desalination by fossil fuel to meet the water demand Continue reading

The North African Military Balance: Force Developments in the Maghreb (Significant Issues Series)

imgThere is no military balance in North Africa in the classic sense of the term. Although rivalries and tensions persist among Algeria, Libya, Morocco, and Tunisia, no state in the Maghreb now actively prepares for war with its neighbors, and the prospects of such conflicts are limited at best. Several countries have had border clashes in the past, and low-level incidents continue on the Algerian-Moroccan border. But none of these clashes has approached the point of serious conflict since these countries achieved independence in the 1950s and 1960s. Although several states in the Maghreb sent symbolic military support to past Arab forces in the Arab-Israeli conflict, these commitments have had no real military significance. Continue reading

North Africa in Transition: State, Society, and Economic Transformation in the 1990s

imgProvides a comprehensive, clairvoyant, and rich study of a number of issues affecting the Maghreb on the eve of the 21st century.”–Yehuda Lukacs, George Mason University

This collection addresses the major problems that Maghreb countries–Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, and Libya–have faced in the last two decades and the cultural and economic issues facing them today, an unusually wide-ranging interdisciplinary study that brings together scholars from the region of North Africa itself as well as from the U.S. and Europe. Continue reading

Social Movements, Mobilization, and Contestation in the Middle East and North Africa: Second Edition (Stanford Studies in Middle Eastern and I)

imgBefore the 2011 uprisings, the Middle East and North Africa were frequently seen as a uniquely undemocratic region with little civic activism. The first edition of this volume, published at the start of the Arab Spring, challenged these views by revealing a region rich with social and political mobilizations. This fully revised second edition extends the earlier explorations of Egypt, Morocco, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey, and adds new case studies on the uprisings in Tunisia, Syria, and Yemen. Continue reading

North Africa: Politics, Region, and the Limits of Transformation

imgThis volume provides a comprehensive overview of the contemporary Maghreb. Made up of contributions from leading academics in the field, it highlights specific issues of importance, including international and security affairs.

With profiles of individual countries and regional issues, such as migration, gender, integration, economics, and war in Western Sahara, as well as a section dealing with international relations and the Maghreb, including US and EU foreign policy and security issues, North Africa: Politics, Region, and the Limits of Transformation is a major resource for all students of Middle Eastern Studies and North African Politics.

Understanding Mali: Connections and Confrontations between the Tuareg, Islamist Rebels, and the Government

imgThis digital book is based around the three main players who took part in the 2012/2013 conflict in Mali: the Tuareg, Islamist rebels, and the Malian government. Tuareg rebels want their own state, or at least greater autonomy and political and economic opportunities; yet, there are many rivalries in the north between and even among different ethnic groups. Islamist rebels want to create an Islamist state in the north based on a brutal form of shari’a Continue reading

Africa and the Disciplines: The Contributions of Research in Africa to the Social Sciences and Humanities

imgAfrican Studies, contrary to some accounts, is not a separate continent in the world of American higher education. Its intellectual borders touch those of economics, literature, history, philosophy, and art; its history is the story of the world, both ancient and modern. This is the clear conclusion of Africa and the Disciplines, a book that addresses the question: Why should Africa be studied in the American university?

This question was put to distinguished scholars in the social sciences and humanities, prominent Africanists who are also leaders in their various disciplines. Their responses make a strong and enlightening case for the importance of research on Africa to the academy.

Paul Collier’s essay, for example, shows how studies of African economies have clarified our understanding of the small open economies, and contributed to the theory of repressed inflation and to a number of areas in microeconomics as well. Art historian Suzanne Blier uses the terms and concepts that her discipline has applied to Africa to analyze the habits of mind and social practice of her own field. Christopher L. Miller describes the confounding and enriching impact of Africa on European and American literary theory. Political scientist Richard Sklar outlines Africa’s contributions to the study of political modernization, pluralism, and rational choice. These essays, together with others from scholars in history, anthropology, philosophy, and comparative literature, attest to the influence of African research throughout the curriculum. Continue reading