Monthly Archives: May 2019

Populism and Euroscepticism after the European Parliament Elections

The total 751 members of Parliament represent the 500 million citizens of the European Union, although that number will be reduced to 705 once the UK exits the EU. While it is a known fact that Britains exit destabilizes the Union, many of its Eurosceptic representatives will no longer have a voice in Parliament — leaving a potentially more united institution in their wake. However, should Brexit be delayed, Britain would hold elections along with the rest of Europe — thereby providing representatives to a body the British people have ultimately voted to withdraw from.

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A shift of power: Romania’s European Renaissance?

According to Ioan Bucuras, the former Secretary General of the Young European Federalists, currently a Member of the Presidium and a Senior EU Affairs Manager at the media network for Europe – EURACTIV, we have witnessed the most colourful and content-driven EU elections campaign in Romania since it joined the bloc in 2007. The civil society, the political parties, the private sector behave according to their European age: Romania will turn 13 in January 2020 and is already celebrating its bar mitzvah. The country has finally reached a stage where it understands the undeniable importance and role of the European Union.

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The revolt of the masses 2.0

In Ivaylo Ditchevs opinion, professor of cultural anthropology at Sofia University, as the globalized world becomes more complex, the tyranny of specialized knowledge becomes ever harder to support. Take the European Union. Few Europeans are able to figure out the subtle ways of its machinery, the interplay of the national and the political, of lobbying and connections. Confusion and anger gave rise to the whimsical figure of the Brussels bureaucrat — obsessed with curvy cucumbers. Accountable to no one, the Brussels bureaucrat complicates things, twists the law and invents complex language to fool the honest citizen.

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What happens with the Eurozone after the EP elections?

Deepening integration of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) has become a cornerstone of the debate regarding the future of the European project. Launched in 1992, the EMU refers to the policies that are put in place — at an economic and fiscal level — to drive convergence of EU Member States in three stages, including both the 19 eurozone members, as well as non-euro states.

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